Nathan Augeard, Author at Kishinkai
Discover all about the first Kishinkai Aikido Club in the whole UK. Come and try our Glasgow classes, the first one is free.
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Author: Nathan Augeard

  Leo Tamaki in Glasgow - December 15 & 16   Leo Tamaki is back in Glasgow on the 15th and 16th of December! This seminar will be a great opportunity to discover the Kishinkai style under the direction of its founder. Everyone is welcome to this exciting weekend, no matter the level, style or background. Join us for this intensive two-day seminar!   Pre-register today to get the best price! Contact me at info@kishinkai.co.uk to save your spot!   In addition, we are organising an expedition to the world-famous Edinburgh Christmas Market. Join us on this fantastic trip on Saturday evening. Just add £10 and we take care of the transport (from Glasgow). Ideal for international practitioners willing to discover Scotland. It is also open to locals, have no fear...

  Leo Tamaki in Glasgow - March 3 & 4   Leo Tamaki will be coming back to Glasgow on the 3rd and 4th of March. He will deliver his second seminar in the UK, a great opportunity to study with the founder of the Kishinkai.   Everyone is welcome, the seminar is open to all ages, styles or practices.       Hours:   Saturday 3                                              Sunday 4 10.00 - 12.30                                          10.00 - 12.30 15.00 - 17.00   Address: Gracie Barra 40 Broomielaw G1 4QN Glasgow   Fee: Pre-registration                  On the day Full seminar:    £50                                  £60 2 classes:         £35                                  £45 1 class:             £25                                  £35   Contact me for pre-registration: Website: www.kishinkai.co.uk/contact-me Email: info@kishinkai.co.uk Phone: 07845479574 Facebook page: @glasgowaikido...

  Aikido, the courage to test one’s hypotheses – by Leo Tamaki   I have always considered Budos[1] to be more than Bujutsus[2], that their ethical dimension should never put aside technical abilities without which they would be empty. It is only by sublimating and guiding concrete abilities via a superior ideal that the practitioner can understand and reach his/her true value. With either element missing, one will then be facing a charlatan or a craftsman of destruction. One of martial ways’ objectives is to lead human beings to overcome their fears. The first, the most instinctive fear is the one about preserving one’s physical integrity. It is only by achieving a tangible martial efficiency that the practitioner can overcome it. Having overcame this primal fear, the practitioner will be able to undertake the remaining part of the long journey ahead… An arduous task that cannot tolerate dogmatisms and obscurantisms which are too often the prerogative of martial traditions.     Studying and polishing A practitioner essentially faces two tasks: refining his/her skills and searching for a better way to do things. Obviously, each will focus on one or the other depending on his/her path and personality. It is a common and constant process, with no finish line....

­   Budo, learning and transmission: from active student to owning one own’s progress – by Alexandre Grzegorczyk   Transmission is an inherent part of the human social construct. The questioning of and will to understand this notion has been growing stronger over the last centuries. Marcel Maus defines transmission as a cornerstone of the human society. The discovery and exploration of techniques were encouraged by the inherent teachings they provide. Efficiency was increasingly improved through practice. Centuries of knowledge have reached us and are still being integrated in our practice. The past influenced our current technical diversity. But first, it is important to look into the notion of technique and have a clear understanding of its meaning. Here is the definition of Marcel Maus, pioneer in bodily techniques and their transmission. “A technique is any traditional and efficient act (and in this, it is not different from a magical, religious or symbolic act). It has to be traditional and efficient. If there is no tradition, then there is no technique and transmission. This is an aspect differentiating humans from animals: by the transmission of techniques and, most likely, orally.” The notion of a technique as a traditional act is interesting. A technique can be transmitted...

  Tanguy Le Vourc'h in Glasgow, October 21st   Tanguy Le Vourc'h will be coming to Glasgow on the 21st of October, for his first seminar in the whole UK! He will deliver a full day of seminar on Saturday. It will be a great opportunity to study and practise with one of the co-founders of the Kishinkai. Trust me, this is a unique opportunity to make the most of! 🙂 Everyone is welcome! Open to all ages, styles or martial arts.   To pre-register and get the best price, contact me.       Hours: 21st of October: 9am - 12pm & 2pm - 4pm   Address: Dojo Andalus 211, New City Road G4 9PA, Glasgow   Fee: Pre-registration                          On the day Full seminar:                 £40               £50 Half-day:                       £25               £40 Children discount:         £20              £25 Children discount only valid for the afternoon session. Children are invited to attend the whole seminar, for only £40 in pre-registration.   Contact me for pre-registration: Website: www.kishinkai.co.uk/contact-me Email: info@kishinkai.co.uk Phone: 07845479574 Facebook page: @glasgowaikido   See you then!...

Koryu Bujutsu: The origin of Budos, from survival to the school of life - by Alexandre Grzegorczyk   War has always been an influence upon nations. Throughout the centuries, wars and conflicts have been an integrative part of humanity, leading to millions of casualties…     Thanks to the evolution of our customs, it is increasingly difficult to fathom the violence of our ancestors’ world. This threat, which was constant for many, led to the creation of warriors’ arts. These arts have evolved over time, becoming more codified. They soon became a way to prepare for war but also to have fun or to spend some energy. Nowadays, only a sportive version of these arts of combat often remains. It makes it difficult to imagine what these disciplines, used to survive on the battlefield, looked like. Barbarism and cruelty have often been used in movies to give us the feeling of being in the middle of the action. However, this trivialisation of violence too often leads to distraction and excitement, rather than compassion and terror when facing the harshness of war.   [caption id="attachment_18081" align="aligncenter" width="728"] Image from Akira Kurosawa's movie "Ran"[/caption]   The world of Koryus[1] Bujutsu[2] On three occasions, I had the impression to live a fraction of the...

  Interview of Kuroda Tetsuzan, inheriting tradition – by Leo Tamaki   Kuroda Tetsuzan is one of the greatest current martial art masters. When he was 20 years old, he became the youngest practitioner ever to receive the title of Hanshi Hachidan (8th dan) of Kobudo from the Dai Nippon Butokutai. Outstanding practitioner, he is also an exceptional theorist who exposed the principles regulating the use of the body in traditional martial ways.   [caption id="attachment_16679" align="aligncenter" width="598"] Kuroda Tetsuzan[/caption]   Sensei, when did you start practising martial arts? When we asked this question, I usually answer that I seriously started training when I was 5 years old. But in truth, I do not remember starting at a particular moment. I was hearing the sound of bokkens[1], shinais[2] and kiais in my mother’s womb. I was born and raised in this world. The dojo was separated from the house only by a partition; I grew up with the sound of practice. As far as my conscious memories go back, I have always been training with adults.   Your childhood must have been quite different from most children. I was not doing a special training. I was raised according to the classical way in a particular surrounding. I do not remember, but I have...

Giving to receive: uke, a cornerstone of the learning process – by Alexandre Grzegorczyk   It is commonly admitted that a whole life of practice is necessary to understand the essence of budo. This affirmation could be debatable, but it is nonetheless true that learning is a never-ending process. Near the end of their life, many masters reported only starting to understand principles they have been studying their whole lives. For example, Funakoshi sensei, aged 80, stated “I now start to understand face-level blocking”. Such testimonies display lifetimes of studying, with a continuous questioning and constant remodelling of their practice. It is obviously not exclusive to martial arts, as the same mindset can be found with many musicians, painters or artisans. Personal study is a mandatory step in progression; however, practice cannot fully exist without a partner, especially in arts of the body. Having good teachers and good uke is a non-negligible factor of our evolution.   [caption id="attachment_16362" align="aligncenter" width="468"] Gichin Funakoshi senseï[/caption]   Being uke It is often stated that uke and tori are two sides of a same coin, both required for a budoka’s evolution. When one is in class, about half the time is spent as uke and half as tori. The teacher usually...

  Learning to learn Aikido (and other martial arts…) – by Leo Tamaki   The shu, ha and ri steps in the learning process of martial traditions are well known. To simplify, shu corresponds to imitation, ha to exploration and ri to mastery. But, if shu ha ri can be linked with the study of a movement, it originally represents the big stages in a practitioner’s life. Today I wish to have a closer look at the much-reduced steps of a movement’s study.     Unbelievable techniques Traditional Japanese martial techniques are very subtle tools. Their goal is to allow an adept to survive a confrontation with one or several opponents that are physically superior. Even if the curriculum of a school is made of several steps with increasing difficulty, the first techniques cannot work after few repetitions (by this I mean the first few thousand times those techniques are performed). A superficial vision can lead to the impression that the techniques are levers or strikes that can be mastered in a few hours. The truth is entirely different. The true efficiency of these movements makes them… literally unbelievable. One cannot believe it. An untrained gaze will only see, in a movement, a lever resulting in an insufficient...

Challenging the Uke-Tori relationship in Aikido – By Tanguy Le Vourc’h   Since beginning Aikido, I have had the chance to meet a number of Aikido, Budo and Bujutsu masters; the main ones being Master Tamura, Master Kuroda, Master Hino and Master Akuzawa. I have spent a considerable amount of time attempting to develop their unique abilities, to feel and live their ways of moving their bodies. Understanding the meaning they give (or have given) to their practice, their system (physical, technical, strategical, philosophical), gave rise to a strong interest and many questions. Especially during the last 6 years, as my training consistently increased. I have the feeling that these masters have been, and are, mainly sharing the findings of their current research. Or, at least, the personal and subtle interpretations of their arts at their current state. I will always be grateful for their precious teachings.     I have realized that it is important to completely immerse oneself in the various ways of practising available and to separate meaningful information from the less useful one. However, above all, it is essential to study a form that has a personal meaning. A French aphorism, which can be understood as “he who mimics the teacher...